Angelinas Reviews · Book Reviews

A Cure for Suicide Review

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From the author of Silence Once Begun—one of our most audacious and original writers—a beguiling new novel about a man starting over at the most basic level, and the strange woman who insinuates herself into his life and memory.

A man and a woman have moved into a small house in a small village. The woman is an “examiner,” the man, her “claimant.” The examiner is both doctor and guide, charged with teaching the claimant a series of simple functions: this is a chair, this is a fork, this is how you meet people. She makes notes in her journal about his progress: he is showing improvement, yet his dreams are troubling. One day, the examiner brings him to a party, and here he meets Hilda, a charismatic but volatile woman whose surprising assertions throw everything the claimant has learned into question. What is this village? Why is he here? And who is Hilda? A fascinating novel of love, illness, despair, and betrayal, A Cure for Suicide is the most captivating novel yet from one of our most exciting young writers. -goodreads.com

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4/5

  • I feel like this book is hard to split up into what I liked and what I didn’t like. A Cure for Suicide was just a random books I found on Overdrive, an ebook library. Going in I had no idea what it was about, I knew the title and I knew it had something to do with someone forgetting something. But as I started the book I realized that I really TRULY had found a hidden gem. I wished more people had read it, I wish more people did because this is a book I really want to talk about.
  • A Cure for Suicide begins with very short chapters, usually 2-4 pages. The length and the format, which I will talk about in a minute, really help shape the story and adds to the mood. The majority of these short chapters are dialogue between the examiner and the claimant, there weren’t any quotation marks (which was weird) but they were split up so you could tell who was saying what. The format made sense because if this were the main characters thoughts or maybe a journal (I’m not sure) it would fit because he has no past memories. He starts off from the very beginning, he needs to be taught how to walk, how to make food, things like that.
  • From the beginning there are a lot of questions. Why does the main character not remember anything? Why this and why that (I don’t want to spoil anything) but MAN IS THIS BOOK WEIRD. The weirdness of it really intrigued me and for the first time, in the longest of whiles, I actually found myself getting excited to read a book. A Cure for Suicide is mysterious!

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  • Sadly my excitement got cut short about 60% through the book. There was this 100 page cut in the story that was just ONE LONG PARAGRAPH. Every so often there would be breaks between time (or something) but the long paragraphs made it hard for me to keep track of where I was. It also took away from my enjoyment of the story. If these paragraphs were split up maybe I would have given this book five stars. But perhaps this format was just because of the nook I use, it could have been my app or something, not the book itself. I did try to change the text a few times but the paragraphs still didn’t split up.
  • After the long paragraph part, I found myself not as connected with the book as I was in the beginning. The ending got a bit emotional although I don’t think it has as big of an impact as it could have. I wish more questions were answered!
  • On a complete side-note this book was called A Curse for Suicide and I can see why, however the book was not about being suicidal.

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4 thoughts on “A Cure for Suicide Review

  1. This is a really interesting review! This book sounds absolutely spectacular, even though you had an issue with the last half. I mean, really, A Cure For Suicide? And I’m really into the whole people-not-knowing-anything thing right now. Which is fantastic, because it’s really popular right now! I’ll definitely have to check it out! 🙂
    -Amy

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