Angelinas Reviews · Book Reviews

A Mortal Song Review

3/5

Sora’s life was full of magic–until she discovered it was all a lie.

Heir to Mt. Fuji’s spirit kingdom, Sora yearns to finally take on the sacred kami duties. But just as she confronts her parents to make a plea, a ghostly army invades the mountain. Barely escaping with her life, Sora follows her mother’s last instructions to a heart-wrenching discovery: she is a human changeling, raised as a decoy while her parents’ true daughter remained safe but unaware in modern-day Tokyo. Her powers were only borrowed, never her own. Now, with the world’s natural cycles falling into chaos and the ghosts plotting an even more deadly assault, it falls on her to train the unprepared kami princess.

As Sora struggles with her emerging human weaknesses and the draw of an unanticipated ally with secrets of his own, she vows to keep fighting for her loved ones and the world they once protected. But for one mortal girl to make a difference in this desperate war between the spirits, she may have to give up the only home she’s ever known. -Goodreads.com

First of all, I’d like to thank Netgalley for allowing me to read this book for free in exchange for an honest review. This doesn’t change my opinion at all!

What I Liked

  • The summary of A Mortal Song was what really sold me. Heir of Mt. Fuji’s spirit kingdomuntil she discovered it was all a lie, how does that NOT sound cool? I’ve always loved Japanese culture and it’s my dream to visit Japan one day, so how could I not read this book after seeing that amazing summary? Speaking of Japan, the culture really stood out in A Mortal Song. There was kami, yakuza, a green dragonfly named Midori (which means green xD) From what I know from my three years or taking Japanese, A Mortal Song really looked into Japan and its culture. I loved everything about that aspect.
  • Another nice thing about A Mortal Song can be seen in it’s description. Sora struggles with her emerging human weakness, Sora is normal, she’s human, she’s not immortal. For once the main character isn’t really ‘The Chosen One,’ she has a weakness but tries to work her way around it and use her humanity as a strength. The change was super nice and something that’s rarely seen in YA novels. Sora, the main character, changes A LOT from the beginning too. She struggles at some points, overcomes obstacles and learns to really appreciate who she is (which may or may not be her humanity)
  • A Mortal Song was SUPER action packed, the battles were well written. There were quite a few twists I didn’t see coming which is SUPER rare. I love when something shocking comes around and you freak out, that was me.

What I Didn’t Like

  • Though A Mortal Song was action packed, I found some parts to be slow and kind of boring. This is more of a personal opinion but some moments seemed to drag on, I think my expectations were too high.
  • The reason why A Mortal Song didn’t get a higher rating, other than the boring moments, was the ending. Or rather the final battle. Every moment built up for that final battle and it ended really quickly. It felt too easy for me, I wish there was a bit more of a struggle

Overall

  • I had high hopes for A Mortal Song, I LOVED how it took place in Japan with Kami. I LOVED how the battles were written as well. But the final battle felt too easy and some moments dragged on.

3/5

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3 thoughts on “A Mortal Song Review

  1. I follow the author so i’ve been seeing this book in my twitter. Same as you, it made me curious because i also like japanese culture. But i agree with your dislikes about it. I don’t like action that drags and too easy with boss battles. I read some books with the same experience.

    Anyway, thanks for the review!

    Like

    1. It was really cool how it was set in Japan, I don’t know many books set in Japan. The action was good though, it just felt a bit slow at times :(. I agree, action shouldn’t drag on, it gets boring… 😦
      Thank YOU for stopping by 🙂

      Like

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